Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Yesterday Was A Good Day, Today Not So Good

I am back on my Arch Linux side of the hard drive because ... wait.

My plan tonight is to use Ubuntu Oneiric Ocelot for the rest of the night maybe until tomorrow but after I updated my packages with the latest updates there are several problems. Firefox' cpu usage is spiking to beyond 100% and Banshee is also showing beyond 100% cpu usage. Good news for Gwibber. It's fast now seemed to be working the way it should.

I killed both Firefox and Banshee and restarted them both. The events for both applications are reproducible therefore it is a bug. No apport window prompts appeared. They might have disable it. Might not be working to their liking. In any case I switched back to here, my Arch Linux OS.

Unity shell seems to me stable so why these two applications.

Let me show some screenshots of my upgrade from Ubuntu 11.04 to Ubuntu Oneiric Ocelot.



After careful calculation Ubuntu update-manager is going to upgrade 1474 files. Are you sure it's safe?

Safe? Of course I'm sure it's safe. Trust me.



Blind faith really. kidding.

I am bold but I have Arch to fall back on so...


Sunday, September 25, 2011

Ubuntu One On Arch Linux

Updated (October 22, 2011): Ubuntu One client is now back in the Ayatana repository. I recommend adding the Ayatana repository to your package source and installing it using Pacman. If you already have Ubuntu one client (via AUR) and wish to get it from Ayatana but getting error messages when installing it, please post to Arch Linux forum for support.



Ubuntu One is a very good alternative to Dropbox. It comes with Ubuntu and if you created an account you need not leave it if you are using another distro. Ubuntu One developers will work with you in installing Ubuntu One on your distro.

I use Arch Linux.

It is available in AUR (Arch User Repository). The ubuntuone-client is available to Arch users here. Arch users should be familiar with installing packages from AUR. If you need to get some background on how to do that, please read this.

There are several dependencies that you also get from AUR, so install those first. In any case, you will get dependency prompts if you try to install a package with dependency not in the Arch repository. Don't worry. The dependencies are available in AUR too. I was able to install the ubuntuone-client after satisfying and installing all the dependencies.

After installation, you need to login. Please open the terminal and type:

$ u1sdtool -c

The ubuntuone login window will guide you to creating an account or signing in. You need an email address and a password. If you have an existing account just fill in the details. Your password will be saved to gnome-keyring.

To start the ubuntuone sync-daemon type:

$ u1sdtool --start

An Ubuntu One folder is created in your home directory.

It also adds Ubuntu One in your list of startup applications. You can check if this is so in:

$ gnome-session-properties

If it is in the list that means you don't have to start it manually.

There's no graphical UI so a cli is your best bet. Open a terminal and type:

$ man u1sdtool

for help with the commands.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

A growing trend in UI these days is minimalism. From Google+ to the new Facebook UI. The drakfire dream theme for GNOME 3 desktop is no exception.

No more title bars? No more titles?













I just updated Banshee to 2.2.x. It automatically refreshed metadata by scanning my directory. It came out fine for me. I just don't like not being told before it does that.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Using Networkmanager Instead of the Network default in Arch

I've been using networking in Arch by default. It is quite sufficient
since I have a wired network and this is a residential desktop. But
since the whole point of using Arch is to learn I have decided to use
Networkmanager to simulate what ordinary laptop users will have to do to
get connections from mobile sources for example.

So to download the necessary packages, I did:

$ pacman -S networkmanager network-manager-applet

as well as:

$ pacman -S dhclient modemmanager dnsmasq

There's still a little tweak that must be done first to make this work.
First open /etc/rc.conf and go to Daemons to edit the array. Make sure
to remove networking and add networkmanager. Place it after dbus to
enable applications which will need internet connection to get
information from network manager. So I have mine like so:

Daemons={...dbus networkmanager ...}

This will ensure that network manager will work at every boot.

I did open GNOME network connection gui too. I made sure it is using
opendns. Click Wired/or whatever your network name is and then edit.
Under ipv4 tab, make sure it is Addresses Only in the dropdown button.
Enter the dns servers: 208.67.220.220 208.67.222.222

Save your settings.

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Drakfire Theme [dash]

Screen shot of the dash in GNOME Drakfire theme with Faenza dark icons.

Drakfire Theme for the Gnome 3 Desktop [Arch]

The default theme for the GNOME desktop is Adwaita. I changed mine to
Drakfire complete theme plus a change from the default GNOME icons to
Faenza [dark].

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

fstab Working and Partitions Mounting At Boot

Since I started to dual boot Ubuntu 11.04 and Arch Linux, I haven't
found a good solution to my various partitions failing to mount at boot.
It works in Ubuntu fstab but when it comes to the Arch fstab, one or two
partitions fail to mount at boot.

I have a partition that mounts on another partition. Or should I say a
partition within a partition, to be clearer. I should have the various
partitions listed in the order that I want them mounted. Ok so it's a
newbie mistake but I was blinded by the Ubuntu fstab that works.

After checking the list of partitions, "/", root first then "/home".
After these two partitions come "/home/user/Directory". Then comes the
"/home/user/Directory/sub-directory". Strictly in this order. Saved
fstab. Reboot.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Pacman Woes Are Due to Security Breach At Kernel.org

My apologies to Arch for the statements I made regarding the slow
updates. I recently read about the security breach at kernel.org and
more likely the reason for the slow speed of my updates. I have changed
my /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist and yes the updates have gone faster.

Monday, September 5, 2011

Pacman Has to Get Better

I finally got my printers working. I got cups (and cupsd in
the /etc/rc.conf) I installed hpoj and a group of printer drivers. So to
get my Arch linux to recognize there's a usb printer connected to my
system I have to run a daemon (ptal-init setup) and include it
in /etc/rc.conf. That finally enabled (after a reboot) my GNOME control
center to acknowledge that there is indeed an HP-3900 at the end of my
usb port.

The real personal story behind my saga with a printer is pacman. It is
now throwing 'network not reachable' everytime I start it. Every
download and sync. I ran --debug and ping ip addresses and so far I will
conclude that it's a really really slow ftp server. The server is so
slow pacman is timing out connections. It's unusable guys.

My first rolling release distro and I've decided that Arch rises and
falls with the performance of their package manager. Great distro for
the DIY community. But sorry I can't recommend Arch linux to my mother
who just want to finish her Monday report to her boss by Monday.

Saturday, September 3, 2011

Additional Screen Shots For Oneiric Ocelot Upgrade

The new Software Center UI.

Upgrade To Ubuntu Oneiric Ocelot

Started the upgrade process at 1:45 am and finished with a reboot at
4:05 am today.

It's faster to download at the early morning hours. Or perhaps I am a
real geek for spending a Friday night infront of my computer. But this
image is nice though.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

I have a previous post about my efforts at dual booting Ubuntu 11.04 and Arch Linux. My goal is to continue using and learning Linux. Switching between the two distros will give me the familiarity of Ubuntu and the 'forced' minimalism of Arch. Minimalism here just means using the command line and modifying config files for various customizations. Things which Ubuntu doesn't conveniently reveal to general users.

 Previous post here will explain the start of this journey.

Now where am I in this little walk. I'm using GNOME 3 in Arch because it's the latest. I'm still using the old GNOME with the Unity shell when I'm in Ubuntu 11.04. This will not last very long now because I plan to upgrade to Ubuntu Oneiric Ocelot Beta tomorrow. I heard a lot of good things during the alpha. Drooling now...

An aside to the post here:
     I'm using a brand new UI for Blogger right now and there's this quirky cursor behavior. When I hit [enter] the cursor jumps to the top-left of the post. Then I hit [down-arrow] and it comes down to the correct location where I want it in the first place. Very odd, smile.

So far problems:
I've found several solutions to finding software in Arch. Compiling from source isn't the easiest and most convenient. I can do it. You can do it. But I don't think you'd like it. The extra and community repository contains most open source software you'll ever need. libalpm is solid. Pacman is the command line front end to libalpm (Arch linux Package management library). So I found my first software I can't seem to get with Arch. Shutter. It's a screen capture tool with all the plugins of GIMP and uploading features to boot.

I was looking for solutions when I found custom unsupported repository. Basically, PPA's (in the Ubuntu side of the universe). You add these personal repository in /etc/pacman.conf and pacman will source it for software. That's how I found a treasure trove of arch fonts and ubuntu fonts. But so far, no Shutter.


I caught the news in Mashable while fast reading my Google Reader. They finally released the new Blogger. Yay!

I'll say that the UI is very clean and non-distracting.

It integrates very well with Google+ and with Google Reader. I think I'll be using Blogger more now than before. I like what they did here.

Reflections On My Blogging: Keeping It Honest

When you're facing a white, blank screen trying to decide what to write, it seemed hopeless and hopeful at the same time. It's like...