Monday, November 25, 2013

Update Re T. Haiyan - The Aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan

Hi Reese

After 18 days Typhoon Haiyan's effects are fully understood now. The Disaster Agency of the Philippines NDRRMC estimates 24 Billion pesos of damaged properties and 3.4 Million people were affected. These are people who have lost loved ones, and lost homes. The current death toll so far is 7,000. The good news is that aid is reaching the hard hit areas and people are seeing government presence and care.

Many countries promised to send help and they did. Some sent doctors and medical supplies for the long haul like the Israelis. Some sent ships and soldiers like the Americans and the Japanese. Many more countries are helping by giving funds for the long days ahead of rehabilitation. Many thanks to them and the United Nations. The Filipinos are grateful for the help.

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Thank You For Your Help - The Aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan



The world responded with material goods and technical and medical help to the victims of Typhoon Haiyan. Thank you to all for your kindness.

Typhoon Haiyan Images - The Aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan



This is how Typhoon Haiyan looked from space as she slams the Philippines with terrible ferocity. The surviviors and aid workers and the army are collecting bodies estimated dead are in the thousands. Damage can only be assessed as total.




Tacloban airport terminal was wiped out but the tarmac is operable.




Tacloban city lay in ruins.




Agricultural areas weren't spared from destruction.

all photos from Washington Post.

Please see this post if you want to give HELP.

Monday, November 11, 2013

The Aftermath of Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) 2

This is a reblog of charly's blog at Wordpress.


Lieutenant Colonel Fermin Carangan is the Commanding Officer of TOG 8, the Air Force unit tasked to provide air support for the islands of Samar and Leyte. On the morning of Friday, November 8, he and his troops were in their office near the Tacloban Airport on red alert, having been informed of an incoming Super-Storm named Haiyan (local name: Yolanda). Here he narrates his ordeal as Haiyan unleashed her fury on the city of Tacloban on that fateful Friday morning.

We were out of the office at 6 am Friday observing. Winds brought by Yolanda were already strong around that time. We (the Air Force troops in Tacloban) were prepared for the possibility of rescue missions days before the expected landfall of Yolanda. Just before 7 am, the rains started to pour, so we took shelter.

Around the same time, we noticed that water was slowly entering our office, so we went out again. Then suddenly, we saw that the water was getting higher and higher, until we were forced to get up the ceilings of the building. We had to bore holes on the ceiling just to get up there, and I was the last one up.
Suddenly the building collapsed and I saw my men falling into the surging water and very strong winds. There was also no more roof on top of the building. I was able to hold on to a piece of wood – a truss which I forcibly removed just before I was taken by waves and the strong current.

I didn’t notice that my two junior officers were now gone. Both were fresh graduates from the PMA, and they were beside me before we were swallowed by the water. Then I saw one of my soldiers trying to hold on to an uncollapsed wall of another destroyed building. I tried to reach for him but the current was too strong and there was confusion and hysteria.
I was going farther and farther out into the sea and all I saw were tips of coconut trees starting to disappear into the swelling water. Suddenly, I saw a child hugging tightly to a floating coconut tree. By a stroke of luck, the current led me to the child, and I was able to pluck him from his very unfortunate situation. He then held on to the piece of wood I was myself holding on to. Then we floated until we were out there in the middle of nowhere.

At sea, we went through another hell. We were slapped by waves, great big waves from all directions. We were also toyed by swirling winds. And we couldn’t help but drink a lot of salt water. I was now getting so tired. And so was Miguel (the boy’s name). He was just 7 years old. Too young to die, I thought. I thought of my family. I prayed to God to take care of my wife and kids. I thought I’ve done to them what every father could – that is, to take good care of them.
I also thought of my men. Days before, I had told them to ensure the safety of their families, especially those in Tacloban since the city could be hit hard and everyone of us would be busy in the rescue missions after Yolanda. They might not have time to check on their families during the rescue. Then I thought of the two new graduates of PMA 2013. I thought that if something happened to me, at least I had been able to give professional and honorable service for a time. And that I’ve done enough since graduation. These two young guys were just starting and still have a very bright future ahead.

Then I looked at Miguel. He was trembling hard due to the cold. His very young body could not just cope up with the elements. He said, “Kuya, I will sleep now. I’m so tired already.” Then I thought, maybe I survived because of this child. Without him I could have given up. Maybe he’s the reason I’m still alive because God wants me to make sure this child will live. I shouted at Miguel’s ears: “Don’t sleep! You can do it. Look, we are near land already.” Then I pointed at what I thought was another wall of swell, just to lift the spirit of Miguel. And then I realized that it was indeed the shoreline!! I thought there really is a Powerful Being!

The two survived Storm Haiyan and the rough seas between Leyte and Samar during the onslaught of the typhoon. They floated around the bay near Tacloban airport and were eventually rescued along the shorelines of Basey, Samar at around 1pm the same day. They had been floating for around 6 hours before they were rescued. Basey and Tacloban are separated by the San Pablo and San Pedro Bay. The devastation they saw along the Basey shoreline is another story worth telling. Some of Lt Col Carangan’s men are still missing. These men were supposed to take part in the relief and rescue operations for Leyte and Samar. Alas, it turned out that they too would be the very victims to Haiyan’s wrath.





We Need Your Help - The Aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan

Super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) devastated the cities of Tacloban, Cebu, Guian as well as the provinces of Leyte, Samar, Aklan, Mindoro and Antique. Most of the deaths occurred as the storm surge filled downtown streets with water and debris. The evacuation centers which was suppose to serve as secure places became watery tombs. There were images of bodies covered with mats along the side of the roads. Relatives are still trying to make contact with their loved ones in those affected places after 2 days. The Philippine Red Cross and Government responders are making their way into isolated barangays. People are cut off with no food and water. So it's a race for survival now.

Here's how you can help. Please exercise due diligence when donating. Ask them how they're going to spend the money.



You can also try the Philippine Red Cross and volunteer in repacking items for distribution. It's more fun to do these with the barkada so call the posse. If you want more details about how to help or to make contact with people who are already organized in your local area please see this link - Rappler article

I'll try and update these post for more information. 

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Noname Cat

I'm surprised it took me this long for a cat to make it to my blog. Internet meet Noname.



3rd generation pet cat. She likes to disappear for a day or two with no reason at all. She doesn't like questions but I suppose it's part of the adventure.

Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan)

Typhoon Yolanda is a monster storm heading for a Leyte landfall around 3 - 6 am tomorrow.




Meteorologists comment that its the strongest storm on Earth this year. It is also one of five Category 5 storms on Earth this year. Typhoon Bopha killed 1,000 plus people in Mindanao alone and this storm is as strong as Bopha.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Dancing Ladies



Imee said these Dancing ladies are beautiful. I agree.

Hanging Plants



Mother calls them dapo. I took them and hang them here, where there's more light.

Boy Sitting on a Board



John john likes to play by the gate/ entrance. Hot day too.

Empty Chairs



I got out to see the wet leaves after the rain this afternoon.