Friday, October 31, 2014

New Computer

I have a new desktop computer. It's an Intel i5-4590 Quad Core, Asus Z97-K motherboard Personal Computer. I installed a 16 GB (2x8 Kingston HyperX sticks) RAM. I chose the Crucial 240 GB SSD for storage. Additionally, I purchased a 2 TB Seagate SATA 6 hard drive for media. The casing is black and lighter than the old one I have back in 2008. The casing is paired with a 730 watt power supply.

I recycled the dvd player and card reader from my old rig.

I thought the old 1 TB Seagate hard drive is finished but after reformatting, it passed the test. It's still okay.

I installed fedora 20 on the boot device.  I'm updating the system now.


output of the lsblk -f command for this computer.

I decided to encrypt the whole device after opting for an LVM.


I'm using the Linux kernel 3.16.6 coming from the updates channel in fedora 20.


Monday, October 27, 2014

Gnucash: Bug in jqplot Used in Graphics

Gnucash2.6.4 in Fedora 20 date: 2014-10-2



Fedora 20 decided to update their repository to this version of Gnucash. One of the most powerful feature of Gnucash is it is very easy to generate graphics from the numbers. However the new version uses a new jqplot to render the graphics and there's a bug.



fedora 20 in Btrfs, GNOME 3.10 in a Stable Platform

fedora 20 installed in btrfs file system. Although fc20 was released December last year, I wouldn't characterize it as last night's cold soup.

With an updated kernel and some key packages in GNOME freshly pushed for it, fedora 20 is far from tired or old.



Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Btrfs on Ubuntu 14.04 (GNOME)

Formatted my SSD into Btrfs this time around. Put Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS.



Now to find me an extra disk to serve as backup to my media files, so I can format sdb partitions to Btrfs too.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

It's Ubuntu Day

10 years ago, on October 2004, a group of open source developers released a Linux distribution based on Debian. They named their first release 'warthy warthog' which is Ubuntu 4.10.

The direction they took breaks the common myths about Linux back in 2004. Ubuntu became known as the most user-friendly distro in the Linux world. It is easy to install, easy to use and has a
supportive community for new end-users.

Linux for humans. Happy Ubuntu Day.


Saturday, October 18, 2014

Btrfs on Fedora 20

I reinstalled my Fedora 20 on a fresh SSD formatted with Btrfs.



It's a much simpler setup in Fedora than in openSUSE. Me thinks that Fedora assumes you know what kind of partitioning your use-case needs and leaves it up to you. openSUSE on the other hand performs the virtual partitioning for you. I didn't encrypt the disks for the Fedora 20 install but I did it encrypt it in openSUSE.

openSUSE and Fedora on my Computer

openSuse or Fedora, which one to use? That is the question. I've been using both one way or the other after I removed Ubuntu 14.04 lts in my hard drive. I suppose I should test both operating systems thoroughly in my computer to see which one is better.

I installed Fedora core 20 three weeks ago then moved on to openSUSE 13.2-rc1. This is a limited test and a blindly subjective one at that so here goes. 

If you want an as close to the "devs-original" GNOME desktop experience, Fedora is what you want in your machine.  It has been default in Fedora for sometime now. The Fedora distribution doesn't try to be a jack-of-all-trade by having a "rolling release" as an alternative for you. They release when it's stable and ready. They update such a release fairly well. I have the newest stable kernel right now while waiting for the next stable release. Stability is the most important thing for me. 

I didn't see this the first time I tried the Fedora installer. Btrfs and xfs IS offered but not by default as in openSUSE. You could click on the dropdown button for choices in file systems during installation/partitioning. I highly recommend using Btrfs and xfs for newest installs of Linux. They're the next generation file systems capable of snapshots, self-healing and great scaling. For end-users the benefits of using them outweigh the annoyance of reformatting the hard drives. 

For those who have an aversion towards the command-line and the terminal, openSUSE is your bet. The level of use of graphical user interface for administrative tasks is very high. There's even a security checklist that's interactive. You can click on items and consider enabling it or read up for help about that issue, in one place.

openSUSE offers a lot on how you may want your Linux. There are the regular releases which is now at 13.1 (but I am testing 13.2.rc1). You could try "Tumbleweed", which is a rolling release for stable packages. In Tumbleweed the user is not limited to the repositories of one release (e.g. 12.3 or 13.1). You could also try "Factory"which is also a rolling release but largely untested packages land here, so be prepared to meet bugs.

Speaking of bugs, I really like Fedora's bug reporting tool which is very prompt. It notifies the user of the system error and asks if you want to report it. Once you click on Yes or No it doesn't nag you anymore. I mean I want to help and I don't mind sending the information with my limited internet connection but hey I'm working here. 

I'll add more items here as my testing progresses.